Surgical Headlight Suggestion

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This topic contains 5 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Dr. Jay Reznick Tue Sep 17, 2019 10:36 am.

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  • #3984

    Michael Wenzel
    Participant

    Hi Dr. Reznick,

    Thanks for the incredible content for such a reasonable price. I found your lectures on dentaltown and they made a big difference. After I finished those, I promptly found you here.

    A consistent theme in your lectures has been good visualization via headlight and loupes. I was wondering, which surgical headlights do you recommend?

    I normally practice exclusively through an operating microscope, so I’ve been spoiled by coaxial lighting and good optics. However, I find it difficult to use the microscope for the occasional surgical extraction and almost all third molar impactions.

    I’ve been looking into the BFW daymark; it seems the light from the headband can be placed directly between the barrels of a pair of loupes, which would be about as close to coaxial as you could get. I was wondering if you had any experience with this company. If not, any recommendations for other companies that offer good surgical headlights?

    Thanks in advance. Your online videos really are making a difference (as cliche and cheesy as that sounds, it’s true)

    Michael

Viewing 5 replies - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
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  • #3985

    Dr. Jay Reznick
    Keymaster

    Hi Michael-
    Welcome to OOS.
    I started using loupes/headlight about 20 years ago and cannot work without them now.I have the Designs for Vision 2.5X wide depth of field surgical telescopes. They are the right balance of magnification, depth of field and field of view for most surgical procedures. For my office headlight, I have been using the BFW HighLite fiberoptic headlight with their MiniMax light source. It sits directly in line with my line of sight. I have had it for 20 years and it still works great. It is very durable, and even though it has a fiberoptic cable, it is very lightweight and comfortable. And I never have to worry about a dead battery. The bulb lasts about 6 months with heavy use.
    For filming, I have a battery-powered self-contained LED headlight.
    Both companies are great to work with.

    #3986

    Michael Wenzel
    Participant

    Thanks for the help.

    It’s decided then – I’m going to go with BFW. Keep up the great work.

    Michael

    #3987

    Dr. Jay Reznick
    Keymaster

    Thanks. Let me know if you have any other questions.

    #3988

    Michael Wenzel
    Participant

    Well if you’re offering… I do have two more questions!!

    I’ve been binge watching all of your videos today, and noticed you consistently cut that little wedge of tissue distal to the lower second molars when removing impacted 3rds.

    Are there certain cases when you’d concerned about damage to the lingual nerve when you cut that little wedge (see photo)? Or is the distal of the second molar consistently miles away from the lingual nerve?

    What’s the best way to know you’ve sectioned enough through an impacted third molar, but not all the way through, as to prevent lingual nerve damage – do you use the length of the bur as a guide? I imagine it must just be automatic for you by now, but it’s something I’m constantly thinking about as I begin to attempt more of these cases.

    Thank you so much for your help.

    #3989

    Dr. Jay Reznick
    Keymaster

    Michael,
    When removing the wedge of tissue distal to the 2nd molar, you want to be sure that you do not go more lingual than the central groove of the 2nd molar. You want to stay away from the lingual mucosa, as the lingual nerve can sometimes be located very superiorly, sometimes close to the top of the lingual ridge.
    As far as sectioning, I use the length of the bur as a guide. You want to go about 2/3 of the way through the crown/root to section them. Less than that, and the tooth will probably not split the way you want. More than that, you risk perforating out the lingual cortex. Just be conscious of the orientation of the tooth and roots. A CBCT is really helpful in this regard. It is my radiograph of choice for all impacted teeth.

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